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Content about Index

August 13, 2012

This last week there were two major announcements from the organizations working on indexing the 1940 census.  Work began early April to take the millions of digital images created from the enumerators work as they visited each household in 1940 and transcribe the information into a searchable index.  This allows individuals to search for those in the census by name rather than browse through hundreds or thousands of images to find their ancestors.

This last week there were two major announcements from the organizations working on indexing the 1940 census.  Work began early April to take the millions of digital images created from the enumerators work as they visited each household in 1940 and transcribe the information into a searchable index.  This allows individuals to search for those in the censu

July 23, 2012

The Genealogy Star blog this week reported that editing has now come to FamilySearch’s new version of their family tree.  The family tree will be a replacement for new FamilySearch when it is released.  It has been in development for many months and its aim is to fix many of the challenges with the current tree.  

The Genealogy Star blog this week reported that editing has now come to FamilySearch’s new version of their family tree.  The family tree will be a replacement for new FamilySearch when it is released.  It has been in development for many months and its aim is to fix many of the challenges with the current tree.  

June 5, 2012

Utah will be available to search by name within the next day or two in the 1940 census at FamilySearch.org.  The total states published to search by name as of the present time are Delaware, Virginia, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, New Hampshire, Utah, Florida, and Wyoming.  An additional seven states are close to release.  They are Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Vermont and Hawaii.  Several other states are completing quickly.  The project is nearly 50 percent complete. 

April 28, 2012

Well, it’s finally here.  On April 2, the United States National Archive released the images of the 1940 census.  Almost immediately the National Archive site was virtually down, it was so slow.  Over the past week the site performance has steadily improved, but it continues to run a little slow.  What is not as well known is that the images are also available on FamilySearch.org/1940census and on Ancestry.com .  Both of these sites are making the images available for free.  If you know where your ancestor lived, you can now find the image in the census.  If you don’t know where they lived you can go to FindMyPast.com who has offered to find your ancestor for you in the 1940 census.  Images will also shortly be available on FindMyPast.com.

 

March 17, 2012

I know I have written a few times about the 1940 census, but here I go again.  We are only a little over a month from the release of the census.  If you have not signed up to index I encourage you to do so.  

I know I have written a few times about the 1940 census, but here I go again.  We are only a little over a month from the release of the census.  If you have not signed up to index I encourage you to do so.  

November 1, 2011

As April approaches preparation work for the 1940 census continues.  Ancestry.com announced that they will be providing a full index to the 1940 census once it is released.  They intend to provide the index free for the first year.

 

March 4, 2011

If meta data is not a term you have heard you are probably not alone.  It is a concept, however, that you will almost certainly have benefitted from if you have done any significant amount of genealogical work.  Meta data, simply put, is data about data.  The most common application of meta data in family history is indexed records of digital images.

If meta data is not a term you have heard you are probably not alone.  It is a concept, however, that you will almost certainly have benefitted from if you have done any significant amount of genealogical work.  Meta data, simply put, is data about data.  The most common application of meta data in family history is indexed records of digital images.