Author Bios

Articles by this author:

  • The Morgan County Fair’s Junior Rodeo is always a crowd pleaser.  Seeing our littlest cowboys and cowgirls get out there and strut their stuff is bound to put a smile on anyone’s face.

  • In an effort to provide more flexibility to property owners tempered with the safety of the traveling public, the Morgan City Council cleared up some gray areas in regard to fencing. After going back and forth for months with the building inspector and City planning commission, the council was happy to see these changes approved.

  • Ashley Haslam has some big shoes to fill as she steps into her new role as Morgan County’s new animal control officer, but she is up to the task.

  • One of the biggest differences between a large newspaper and a small-town publication is that a large paper will have a large office staff. A small town newspaper doesn't have that luxury.
    Each staff member at The Morgan County News has a number of hats to wear and a number of places they need to be to perform their daily tasks.
    Now that Morgan Valley Crafts is fulfilling all the copy/print needs of the community, we at The Morgan County News have less need to have the office staffed full-time.  Official hours will be limited to Wednesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

  • Saturday, June 27, Jack and Jean Harris and Clif and Virginia Burwell hosted the 10th annual Porterville Car Rally. The turnout was even better than expected according to the hosts.

  • After the daunting task of crunching numbers, the Morgan City Council gave final approval for the 2015-16 RDA and city budgets.  In addition, approval was given for a 14 percent sewer increase and a $1 increase per garbage can within city limits.

  • Every year local youth look forward to an appearance from one of our very own Utah Jazz players.  For the third year in a row, Morgan kids will have the opportunity to meet 2012 NBA Slam Dunk Champion Jeremy Evans on Saturday, June 13 at 10 a.m.

  • At 10:30 p.m. Monday, local firefighters were dispatched to a structure fire on Bigler Lane in Peterson. Ten firefighters from station 121 and four firefighters from station 131 responded with three engines.

  • On the evening of Friday, May 1, Senator Mike Lee honored youth from across the state who earned appointments with various military academies.

  • Every parent has reasons they want their children to participate in group sports, and many are ferociously competitive.  But few have the longing to simply have their child enjoy being able to compete in a loving environment with their peers, just for the simple notion of belonging to a team.

  • After 39 years of root canals, cavities, implants and routine visits, Morgan County resident Dr. Eric Anderton is hanging up his dental tools.

  • Envision Utah President Robert Grow related a thought that Larry H. Miller once shared with him. Miller said, “I would give back every car I have ever sold if Utah could go back to the way it used to be.”  However, until a proper time travel device has been invented, all we can do is look to the future to ensure our children will be able to enjoy the same opportunities and environments that we have in our communities today.

  • “Animal lovers are a special breed of humans, generous of spirit, full of empathy, perhaps a little prone to sentimentality and with hearts as big as a cloudless sky,” said John Grogan.
    No statement could describe Animal Control Officer Paula Harrington Pentz better. Pentz was loved by everyone who came in contact with her for whatever reason. Resident Julee Hemingway recalls running into Pentz at the store. “My son just had surgery and she was trying to get him to smile. She had such a big heart! She will be missed.”

  • The dirt has been flying around State Street with all the new construction, but soon you will see a remodel added to that list.

  • Clean air, healthy habits, longevity and access to exercise opportunities all played a part in Morgan County being named Utah’s healthiest county for the sixth year in a row according to a national County Health Rankings study.

  • The top honor for rodeo queen hopefuls in Utah has been awarded to Morgan High School graduate, Bailey Jo Woolsey. Woolsey won the coveted golden tiara on the final night of the 2014 Ogden Pioneer Days Rodeo, making her the only Morgan County resident ever to hold the title.
    Bailey begins her reign as Miss Rodeo Utah 2015 after spending the last few months as “lady in waiting” to last year’s queen. Bailey is the daughter of Jared and Lisa Woolsey; her grandparents are Dennis and Sheila Woolsey and Dean and Karen House.
    Along with her family, Bailey invites you all to attend her formal coronation and gala on Jan. 29, at the HUB 801 Events Center, 3525 Riverdale Road in Ogden.  Doors open at 5:30 p.m., dinner will be served throughout the night and the actual coronation will take place at 6:30 p.m.  There will be silent and live auctions that evening as well.

  • One thing that can almost always be guaranteed every tax season is that new rules and guidelines will be introduced to implement new tax laws passed.  This year, the new Affordable Health Care Act will be the biggest kink in the tax chain.
    "Your tax preparer is going to need as much detail regarding your health insurance coverage for yourself and every person residing in your home or that qualifies as a dependant on your return," according to local tax preparer Karen Nelson. "Plan on spending a lot more time this year on tax return preparation and consulting with your preparer if needed."

  • Each year Morgan Middle School students begin celebrating the holidays by thinking of people who are in need.  Instead of focusing on their own Christmas lists, kids participated in a fund raiser to raise money for two local families who needed help with rising medical costs.

  • Christmas is a time of giving, charity and spending time with loved ones.  In an effort to assist those in need in our own community, the Morgan food pantry is asking residents to join in the spirit of the season and take their families to dinner.

  • Christmas is a time of giving, charity and spending time with loved ones.  In an effort to assist those in need in our own community, the Morgan food pantry is asking residents to join in the spirit of the season and take their families to dinner.

  • The holidays are generally filled with shopping and stress.  It is rare that we actually take the time to step away from the hustle and bustle and enjoy a day with our families.  
    This time of year Commercial Street gets a Christmastime face lift to prepare for the Ol’ Time Christmas on Commercial Street celebration.  It is Morgan City’s way of saying “thank you” to its residents.

  • Morgan City has made a stride forward in coordinating community events.  This move involved hiring a new event coordinator to work with the city council in not only making sure that big events are successful, but assisting in economic development and day-to-day operations as well.

  • As more and more tractors fill the empty lot next to the local Ace Hardware store, clearing land and hauling away debris, it is becoming apparent that Morgan City will be home to the newest Tractor Supply Company location.

  • One of the things people love most about Morgan County is the small town feel.  This down home feeling is most obvious around the holidays in Morgan.  Here are the Halloween events going on all around us.
    Trick-or-Treat Street
    Everyone knows that Halloween in Morgan City means “Trick-or-Treat Street.”  This event that takes place on Oct. 31, from 4-6 p.m. is just as much fun to watch as it is to be a part of.  When you turn onto State Street or Commercial, it is like stepping back in time to a street full of children dressed up as their favorite haunt.

  • Glenn and JoAnn Allgood left this life the same way they lived this life--together.  JoAnn Allgood had suffered recently from dementia and Glenn was by her side every second helping her through it. Glenn kept driving his tow truck until very recently when he discovered an old cancer had returned. The couple's love story would come to a nearly simultaneous close. After driving tow trucks and school buses for decades, the two died one day apart.

  • One of the reasons Morgan County is frequently named the healthiest county in Utah is because of the variety of exercise  options in the area.
    While there are a welcome array of gym options in Morgan City, the loss of the Lone Tree fitness center left a void for many Mountain Green residents.  Locals expressed their desires for something to fill that void, and Mountain Green resident Jenn Whiting, along with her business partner Angie Siddoway, will soon be doing their best to make sure all those needs are met.

  • Parks are a tangible reflection of the quality of life in a community.  They are often a major factor in the perception of quality of life in our communities.  Parks and recreation services are often cited as one of the most important factors in how livable communities are.

  • A state-wide rug and fiber guild with Morgan members will be holding their annual event in the county in October.

  • The holidays are filled with fun and tradition wherever you go, but very few communities have such a wide array of things you can participate in for free.   The city, local businesses and community members all pitch in to make sure that there are plenty of fall holiday memories made right here at home.

  • The Morgan Stars showed their strength and endurance at the region Special Olympics swim meet this weekend.  The competition was held at Utah State University and seven Morgan Olympians swam their hearts out.
    Katie Carter, Maddie Francis, Katie Kearsley, Chiara Johnson, Matt Allen and Jackson Sommers dove right in and came out ahead of most of the competition.  

  • The Morgan City Council met this week to discuss capital improvement rankings, Tucker Farms rezone and Riverbend apartments.

  • Friday night the Morgan High School Trojan football team took on the Emery Spartans and conquered this year’s homecoming game. Unlike the historic story of the Trojans and Spartans, the Morgan Trojans had no problem taking apart the Spartan offense, winning the game 35-0.
    In the first down, Morgan quickly lit up the board with 14 points. It was apparent the Spartans were going to have a tough time getting anything past this strong defense.
    Very little of the game was actually played on the visitor side of the 50 yard line, as the clock ticked on.
    At half-time, the score was 21-0 and it was time for the cheerleaders and the drill team to work their magic on the field for the packed stadium. Both gave performances worthy of the crowd’s applause.
    As the 2014 Homecoming royalty approached the field, the stands roared with cheers for the adorable Maddie Francis and Josh Woitaszewski, this year’s queen and king.  Francis was thrilled to be there, waving both hands at the crowd with Woitaszewski leading the way with a giant smile. Woitaszewski is the son of Mark and Melissa Powers and Francis is the daughter of Richard and Triscia Francis.

  • The Morgan City Council met this week to discuss capital improvement rankings, Tucker Farms rezone and Riverbend apartments.
    When city or county governments would like to seek funding for projects through grants or loans, those projects must appear on their Capital Investment Plan. This plan goes before the Council of Governements (COG) and that body then assigns importance to each line item.  
    The COG consists of both city and county councils as well as the school district.
    Changes were made to the 2015 plan at the latest Morgan City Council meeting. The plan currently includes sewer improvements as the highest priorities.

  • Despite the unusually rainy August evening, over 200 runners showed up for the second-annual Color Us Bright Fun Run on Monday, Aug. 25.  
    This low-key 3K event starts everyone out with clean white T-shirts. Seasoned participants know that sunglasses are a must in a color run, but glasses were provided to those who were new to this.  As the color packs containing colored corn starch were handed out to participants, it didn’t take long before many shirts were brightly colored.
    Bright smiles were on the faces of youth ready to take the starting line. Throughout the short run, stations sponsored by community businesses splattered runners with even more color.  
    The Morgan Education Foundation, that puts on the event, is always grateful for local support and hopes more businesses will join in helping the four schools in our district. 

  • Former Morgan resident Melissa Wilson, daughter of Ed and Sharlene Olsen, will be sharing her newfound talent with The Morgan County News in the form of her cartoon strip, Wonders and Blunders.  

  • Everyone knows that business is starting to boom again on historic Commercial Street. What you might have missed is how much these new businesses have evolved.

  • After 45 years of teaching, much-loved instructor Cherril Grose decided it was time to put down the chalk for the second time.

  • Tuesday morning, 40 Holcim employees were encouraged to forgo their regular workday to offer service instead.  They loaded their gear and headed to the Morgan Lions Club lodge.
    The volunteers arrived early, filling the parking area with pickup trucks, flatbed trailers and cement trucks.  As work began, the grassy area was loaded up with old railings and faulty pieces of wood to make way for updated cement stairs and a new patio behind the facility. 

  • Dedicated youth still seeking donations for new marquee

  • As families with small children arrived at the Morgan County Fair to participate in the children’s games, local businesses, families and individuals gathered Saturday in the Ray W. Little Education Pavilion to purchase sheep, hogs and steers in support of area youth.  
    Each youth can show as many animals as they would like, but you can only sell one animal in the junior livestock event.  This year 150 animals were sold, which means that 150 youth raised livestock for this occasional.  That is a lot of responsibility for kids this age and gives them a great chance to learn about and respect where their food comes from.
    For almost a year, junior livestock participants must learn to properly feed, care for and exercise their animals.  This is no small task.  Especially for those raising steers that weigh ten times what the children raising them weigh.

  • Every year local youth look forward to an appearance from one of our very own Utah Jazz players.  For the second year in a row, Morgan kids will have the opportunity to meet 2012 NBA Slam Dunk Champion Jeremy Evans on Monday, Aug. 4.  

  • This year’s wrangler contest was a little different than in the past thanks to the weather. The much needed rain couldn’t damper the spirits of these young cowboys. Their dedication to the sport was evident in each ride.
    Jon Cannon graciously offered the use of his equestrian facility, Graceland, located on Island Road. It turned out to be the perfect solution under the circumstances.

  • As of Monday, July 28, the Morgan County fire dubbed the Tunnel Hollow fire was completely contained.  The fire was ignited by lightening on Sunday, July 20, and grew as windy conditions blew the flames up the mountainside.
    Thankfully, the breeze also blew in a rain storm that provided much needed precipitation to help contain the last four percent of the blaze.
    Eight smokejumper teams, a HotShot team and seven hand crew teams were brought in to fight the fire that eventually ate up 1,600 acres of land in Morgan County. 

  • Shane Rappleye opened his new store on Commercial Street to give Morgan youth a place to work in a clean atmosphere and gain much-needed job skills.  However, with other business ventures taking up a large chunk of his time, Rappleye made the tough choice of putting Traders Apparel on the market.

  • Shane Rappleye opened his new store on Commercial Street to give Morgan youth a place to work in a clean atmosphere and gain much-needed job skills.  However, with other business ventures taking up a large chunk of his time, Rappleye made the tough choice of putting Traders Apparel on the market.
    After a lot of thought, Justin an Aimee Ferrin expressed their interest in purchasing the company. “The Rappleyes have been friends of ours for a long time and when the business went up for sale, we saw it as an opportunity to be involved in and give back to the community as well as it being a good teaching tool for our sons to get real-life, on-th- job experience,” said Aimee.

  •  
    June 21 marked the official grand opening of TRAX PowerSports on Morgan’s main thoroughfare.  TRAX employees Enoch Cronk and Eden Farnsworth said they were pleased with the turnout.

  • Friday, June 13, 1st Bank locations in both Morgan and Mountain Green honored our hometown heroes.  The parking lot and street corners were full as the public gathered to pay tribute our veterans, EMTs, firefighters and police officers.

  • Patience is a virtue. In our fast-paced world today, sometimes we forget to slow down and remember our roots. Thankfully, we still get little reminders of hard work and patience in our small town.

  •  With all the changes happening within the walls of the Morgan City offices the past few months, one can expect a period of transition.  There have been many misgivings about the 4th of July celebration with all these changes, but Morgan City officials are happy to announce that the show must go on.

  • Fireworks and Independence Day celebrations go hand in hand. Public firework displays are a much loved tradition in Morgan, but government officials ask that you use common sense and courtesy when conducting backyard displays.
    Morgan City and Morgan County have adopted the Utah code when it comes to private firework displays. According to Utah code 5-4-5, “It is unlawful to discharge fireworks in such a manner that the fireworks project over or onto the property of another person without the consent of the person owning or controlling such property.”
    This makes it difficult to let off fireworks in smaller subdivisions.  With the removal of some height restrictions, even legal fireworks can end up in someone else’s yard, or worse, on their home.  Local officials are asking residents to consult their neighbors before the launching of private firework displays to prevent any discord.
    If you happen to see any violations of the above provisions, please go through the proper authorities for enforcement of this code.  Enforcement of this code is handled by your local fire chief or police department.  Residents must be willing to make an official statement in order for the ordinance to be properly enforced.
    Fireworks may only be discharged three days before the holiday, on the holiday and three days after, so your window for Independence Day fireworks has passed.  This information will however, apply to Pioneer Day celebrations.

  • The 4th of July parade is something all of Morgan County looks forward to each year.  Usually the excitement comes from the children standing on the side of the road with bags hoping they will be filled to the brim with Independence Day treats.  
    While this was as true this year as any year, one young lady in the crowd was about to get something much more valuable than candy thrown from a float. A diamond ring was in her future.
    Cormick Breshears wanted to make his marriage proposal to his girlfriend, Whisper Givan, a fireworks show so unique and special that she, along with the town of Morgan, would never forget.  
    He strategically planned it so Whisper never questioned him about riding in the parade float with the Morgan High School wrestling team.  After all, he was the assistant coach, so it was only appropriate.  “To say that I was nervous is an understatement, I was terrified!” said Breshears.  
    He continued saying that keeping it a secret was no easy task.  “There were so many times where I almost slipped and said something about it. A couple of times I did slip and ask my parents something right in front of her,” commented Breshears.
    As the fully decorated Razor approached, all the cameras came out. Givan said, “I think I was the only one in the dark.  Everyone else in my family knew.” But as the Razor began to turn, she started to wonder why the wrestling parade float was so girlish and void of any wrestlers. 

  • Every year hundreds of thousands of Americans celebrate Independence Day with a big bang of fireworks.  You can find stands on just about every street corner during the holiday, but where you choose to buy your sparklers and fountains makes a difference to one local family.
    Morgan’s neighborhood firework stand is sponsored by Acme Discount Fireworks, but run by Morgan residents Jaime and Gina Grandpre. 
    Shopping local helps unite our community. “Knowing that you are supporting your neighbors and friends, gives us all a sense of pride in where we live,” commented Gina. 
    In support of shopping local, the family decided to change locations this year.  Instead of being housed in the parking lot of Ridley’s, the firework stand will be located in the lot next to Front Street Gifts and Crossfit Unknown.  This lot is owned by a Utah resident, resulting in a much better deal on the lease of the property, according to the Grandpre family.

  • When you live in beautiful surroundings, like those in Morgan County, you are bound to spend a lot of time outdoors.  The sunshine makes you feel so carefree, most people don’t even think about little things like checking for ticks after a great hike or walk through the woods.

  • With all the changes happening within the walls of the Morgan City offices the past few months, one can expect a period of transition.  There have been many misgivings about the 4th of July celebration with all these changes, but Morgan City officials are happy to announce that the show must go on.

  • Exciting things have been happening in recent months on State Street. Several new businesses have opened their doors and others seem to have been growing without actually opening any doors.

  • On Saturday June 14, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. you will see many volunteers up and down the banks of the Weber River.

  • Morgan youth eagerly watched the skies, hoping for a cloud free morning this Memorial Day. After a rained out flight schedule on Saturday, the young fliers were especially excited to be out in the beautiful weather Monday morning.

  • For many years Morgan has known its own fire chief, Dave Rich, as the face of Farm Bureau Insurance.  Rich has made the decision to retire and is turning the reins over to a new friendly face, Cole Everitt.

  • The last few months have brought many changes to the Morgan City Council.  The resignation of Mayor Jim Egbert resulted in bringing Morgan City their new mayor, Ray Little.  The domino effect of Little’s appointment to the mayoral seat was that his council seat was left vacant.

  • Every other year, the Morgan High School band gets to embark on a journey outside of their normal school routine.  This year, their adventure took them to Washington D.C.

  • The Livastride Youth Foundation is excited to announce the very first “Tee up for LYF” golf tournament held on Saturday, June 7 at Round Valley Golf Course in Morgan.

  • Tuesday, May 6, crowds gathered around railroad tracks in Morgan County waiting for “Big Boy.” This mammoth size steam engine was built in 1941 and weighs in at a whopping 1.2 million pounds.

  • Morgan residents know how amazing it is to live in this beautiful county, away from all the hustle and bustle.  There are a few things, however, locals have had to sacrifice as a part of being such a rural community.  

  • Everyone would like to think they will never be in a position to need physical therapy. Unfortunately anyone who skis down a mountain, runs a marathon, or even just steps off a curb wrong will eventually find themselves in the physical therapist’s office.

  • Morgan City has made a stride forward in coordinating community events.  This move involved hiring a new event coordinator to work with the city council in not only making sure that big events are successful, but assisting in day-to-day operations as well.

  • There is a growing awareness for the need of foster families in society now days.  This extends not only to children, but animals as well.

  • Monday evening the talented students at Morgan Middle School put on quite a show.  Parents and community members were greeted with rows of artwork and lots of excited smiles.

  • Charter schools are nothing new these days, but the Utah Military Academy offers something no other charter school in Utah has yet, a disciplined military environment.

  • Sugar and spice and everything nice is what this year’s Troyettes are made of, especially when they appear in their best royal attire.

  • With the current economic climate, there has been a boom in the buying and selling of pre-owned items on facebook and classified pages.  The new Traders Apparel store on Commercial Street facilitates this same concept in retail form.  

  • Wednesday evening Morgan High School band students, parents and community members were treated to a special performance from the Ogden Buddhist Taiko drum group.

  • Most boy scouts start their training as young boys, giving them plenty of time to earn all the merit badges and advancements they need to become Eagle Scouts before they graduate high school.

  • In a larger community, an unassuming, gentle man like Duane Stock may have gone unnoticed, but a man such as this is celebrated in our small town.

  • The Morgan County Animal Control and River Valley Veterinarian, Dr. Jason Lott have teamed up to provide discounted rabies vaccinations, microchips and 2014 licensing.

  • There are not many things that can get kids out of bed early over Christmas vacation, but plenty of kids showed up to celebrate the first anniversary of the brand new Morgan Health Center.

  • There are a lot of fitness fads going around right now.  It is hard not to get caught up in the things that are fast and easy fixes.  The problem is most of those don’t last.

  • There is an air of change in today’s political scene. Local businessman John Barber
    hopes that he can affect which way that wind blows by giving up some of his
    retirement hours to serve his fellow residents in Morgan with a run for the Utah
    Senate Seat 18.
  • The new Morgan Health Center is about to celebrate their first anniversary in their new and updated building.

  • In a town full of hobby sportsmen and serious hunters, Morgan County has had a noticeable void in the gun and ammo industry.

  • Another era is coming to an end in Morgan.  Wally’s Automotive will be closing its doors to business for the last time this week and Wally Kitchin will be entering a new phase of his life: retirement.  

  • Each year Morgan Middle School students begin celebrating the holidays by thinking of people who are in need.  Instead of focusing on their own Christmas lists, kids participate in a fund raiser to raise money for our local food pantry.

  • At Thanksgiving time, we often think about things we are grateful for in our lives.  Being thankful is a wonderful thing, but the best way to show gratitude is to focus on the “giving” in Thanksgiving.

  • The arrival of Deseret Book items on the shelves of Morgan Valley Crafts has brought a lot of attention to Commercial Street.

  • This time of year is generally filled with shopping and stress.  There is pressure to make sure everyone is happy on Christmas morning.  It is rare that we actually take the time to step away from the hustle and bustle and enjoy a day with our families.  

  • Five generation pictures are naturally hard to come by, but this five generation shot has a particularly unique story behind it.  

  • As another fall season goes by, we congratulate and thank all those involved in coaching and refereeing in our valley.  

  • As time goes by every industry goes through changes, and the towing business is no exception.  Since Glenn’s Towing opened in 1956, full-service gas stations have been replaced by convenience stores in strip malls. Lease options and longer warranties have made it easier to rotate through new cars instead of buying used. Changes like this have led to a decrease in business for local towing companies.

  • In an effort to keep property taxes low in Morgan, there has been a growing awareness to shop locally.  The biggest hurdle to getting people to spend their dollars in town is that residents don’t always know all that is available to them within the county.

  • At the State Board of Education meeting, Friday, Oct. 4, Mountain Green resident Lydia Nuttall was honored with an achievement spotlight and awarded a Certificate of Excellence for exemplary service and dedication in improving education for Utah students.

  • There are people who come into this world destined to make a difference to those around them, and when they leave this world there is a clear void.  Steph Nance was one of those people.  

  • There were many residents of Morgan County who participated in this year’s LOTOJA race, but one racer made a big impression on fellow cyclists.

  • There are many American flags that proudly grace the Morgan County skyline, but there are few that have stories like the flag the flies over Young Ford in Morgan.

  • LaNeece Davenport from the Wasatch Front Regional Council attended this week’s Morgan County Council of Governments (COG) meeting to discuss Morgan County’s participation in a regional broadband study.

  • After competing for their titles earlier this week, Head Wranger Daxton Rowser and Queen Madison Bohman presided over this week’s fair activities. 

  • After competing for their titles earlier this week, Head Wranger Daxton Rowser and Queen Madison Bohman presided over this week’s fair activities. 

  • This year’s Morgan Valley Marathon was a huge success.  

  • At the annual Morgan Relay For Life event, residents come together to honor cancer survivors, remember loved ones lost, and fight back against a disease that has already taken too much. 

  • After exhausting every option available to them, the Morgan City Council approved a conditional use permit for the Alpha Counseling and Treatment center.

  • When you live in a small town, soccer can be pretty competitive. The kids love to play and they love to win, which is what makes this story so touching.
    Jackson Sommers was born with cerebellar atrophy, which happens when the cerebellum is smaller than normal or has atrophied from a previous state. Jackson had an MRI at 10 months old and by the time he was 2 years old, his cerebellum had atrophied to 40 percent of what a normal cerebellum should be.

  • All across the world people are affected by cancer in some way and Morgan is no different.  It seems that around every corner there is another tragic story.  For this reason, the community rallies in support of the annual Relay for Life event.  This year the event will begin August 9 at 6 p.m.

  • While other kids spend their summer texting and playing video games, Gina Tia Buchanan is spending the remainder of her summer helping her community.

  • The parking lot of the new Family Dollar has been full for the last couple weeks as employees prepared for their Independence Day opening.  

  • 100 degree temperatures do not draw crowds away from the Widowmaker Event in Croydon.  However, the sanity of some riders who attempt this climb is often in question as they make their death-defying climbs, especially in this kind of heat on a rose colored hill.

  • 100 degree temperatures do not draw crowds away from the Widowmaker Event in Croydon.  However, the sanity of some riders who attempt this climb is often in question as they make their death-defying climbs, especially in this kind of heat on a rose colored hill.

  • 100 degree temperatures do not draw crowds away from the Widowmaker Event in Croydon.  However, the sanity of some riders who attempt this climb is often in question as they make their death-defying climbs, especially in this kind of heat on a rose colored hill.

  • Riverside Park was full of children, laughter, games and Bible stories during the Party in the Park last week presented by Morgan Grace Fellowship.

  • Anyone who has taken the ACT test knows what a grueling process it is.  

  • “Is anyone here a redneck?” questioned the announcer at the United Truck Pulls on Saturday, June 15. This would seem to be a redundant question to outsiders, but those inside the sport know that there is more to truck pulls than that.

  • In the entertainment venue, summer hits have been largely centered around superheroes.  Locally, we have our own superheroes—those who volunteer countless hours and dollars to serve their community.
    Cries of sadness could be heard all over town from the lack of Independence Day festivities.  Becky Shaw heard that call and came to the rescue.  In a single bound she picked up the heavy torch and took on the daunting task of planning an entire Fourth of July celebration in just a few weeks. 
    Thankfully, many people stepped up and volunteered to be her sidekicks.  You may have seen someone running around town handing out parade flyers or throwing together last-minute floats.  If you see them without their capes, please assist them with this crazy undertaking.  If you would like to enter a float in the parade, there is still time!

  • As you made your way through Morgan City this week, one couldn’t help but notice all the red shirts around town.
    Every year, the Washington Heights Church picks a community to serve.  The church has several mission programs overseas that members participate in, but members who couldn’t afford to travel across the globe wanted to affect change in their local communities. 
    This desire to serve and “share God’s love” sparked the original “Serve Ogden” efforts.  Last year “Serve Ogden” became “Serve Bountiful,” and this year “Serve Morgan” was born.

  • The Morgan Valley Marathon has been a dream in the making for the past few years. The idea of a marathon in Morgan began among a group of friends who love to run the roads of the beautiful Morgan Valley. 

  • Friday, June 7, Milton residents had an unexpected guest: an American black bear.  

  • Familiar faces were seen all around at this year’s Morgan Academy of Dance recital.

  • After 32 years of service Morgan’s favorite delivery guy, Brent Rose, has retired.  Rose made his last delivery on May 31, 2013.  

  • Every year the residents of Morgan County look forward to the quilt auction at the county fair.  In order for this auction to be a success, donations are needed.

  • Every year local youth look forward to an appearance from one of our very own Utah Jazz players.  This Monday, June 3, Morgan kids will have the opportunity to meet 2012 NBA Slam Dunk Champion Jeremy Evans.  

  • In light of the events in Boston, Isaac Clark collected used running shoes for the less fortunate to earn his Cub Scout World Conservation Award.  

  • Smoke was sent billowing into the already cloudy skies of Morgan on Wednesday, May 8, after an accident engulfed a garage in flames.  The actual cause of the blaze is under investigation.

  • Opening a new business is exciting for anyone, but it takes on a whole new level of joy and relief when you have been waiting as long as Lars and Kera Birkeland, owners of Mountain Green Kids Club.

  • The Morgan High School soccer team wrapped up their region play in a game against Tooele on April 25. 

  • Our little valley is known for amazing results from volunteer efforts to improve the community and Morgan’s new bike park will certainly add to that legacy.

  • Commercial Street has experienced a recent boom in businesses opening their doors.  The newest addition is Traders Apparel.

  • Kassidee Dunford, member of the Browning pro staff program, competed in the ACUI Collegiate National Championship in San Antonio, Texas.

  • If you have been lucky enough to steer clear of the flu this season, you may not have noticed the changes around the new Morgan Health Center.  

  • When you live in a close-knit community like Morgan County, it is easy to run under the assumption that nothing bad ever happens here.  However, victims of domestic abuse in this county know the unfortunate truth behind the facade.

  • Cameron Skinner, Morgan High School varsity basketball player, has been selected to represent his school on the UHSAA Academic All-State Basketball Team.

  • It is no secret that Morgan County schools are hurting financially.  With recent talks of budget cuts, voted leeways and tax increases, there is a lot of talk about what could be done to help alleviate the burden, but there isn’t a lot of action.  Few people are willing step up to the plate to affect actual change.  

  • This year the staff at The Morgan County News would like to make your newspaper reading experience a little more interactive.  You may have seen our weekly word of the week contests.  Maybe you have tried to identify the individuals in an old photo for a prize.

  • As resolutions are beingAs resolutions are being made for the new year, home ownership and better money management are often at the top of the list.  Debbie Leonard, one of Morgan City’s newest real estate brokers, hopes to assist residents in achieving some of those goals.

  • The members of Morgan Grace Fellowship are so excited about starting a new church in Morgan County.

  • Kassidee Dunford is the latest addition to Browning’s pro staff program and a joy to work with according to Scott Grange, director of public relations and shooting promotions for Browning.

  • When it comes to selecting a place to get in shape, many people are intimidated.  Chans Porter, owner of CrossFit Unknown, hopes that he can help ease that intimidation with his new fitness center.

  • Morgan County recently bid a fond farewell to a household name, Barber Brothers Ford.  In 1981, the Barber brothers opened their first location in Morgan City.  They started out as High Country Chevrolet Oldsmobile and after several changes, ended up taking on the Ford franchise and moved their building to its current location in 1998.  

  • This time of year is generally filled with shopping and stress.  There is all this pressure to make sure everyone is happy on Christmas morning.  It is rare that we actually take the time to step away from the hustle and bustle and enjoy a day with our families.  

  • On Nov. 13, the Utah Commission on Civic and Character Education along with the Utah State Board of Education hosted the second annual Symposium on Social Studies and Civic Education in Utah Schools.  During this event, Lydia Nuttall of Mountain Green was presented with the 2012 Community Leader in Civic and Character Education award by Lt. Governor, Greg Bell.  

  • Saturday, Oct. 27, the Morgan High School volleyball team took third place in the 3A volleyball state championships at the UCCU Events Center in Orem.

  • If you like Wood Creations, you are going to love the newest store on Commercial Street: Morgan Valley Crafts.  For some time now, many Morgan City Council meetings have been focused on revitalizing Commercial Street and we are starting to see the success of their hard work.

  • Thursday, Oct. 25, snow packed roads caused numerous slide-offs on I-84.  Because of the slide-offs, several semis pulled over only to get stuck in the snow on the sidelines.  The road was closed for several hours to allow time for snow removal and clean-up.  

  •  
    The Utah Giant Pumpkin Growers held their annual weigh-off on Sept. 29 at Thanksgiving Point.  There was a lot of excitement as the pumpkins were weighed from smallest to largest.  As the pumpkins got bigger, the crowd grew both in size and intensity.  

  • The holidays are filled with fun and tradition wherever you go, but very few communities have such a wide array of things you can participate in for free.   The city, local businesses and community members all pitch in to make sure that there are plenty of holiday memories made right here at home.

  • Thursday, Oct. 25, snow packed roads caused numerous slide-offs on I-84.  Because of the slide-offs, several semis pulled over only to get stuck in the snow on the sidelines.  The road was closed for several hours to allow time for snow removal and clean-up. 
    Highway 39 through Ogden Canyon was also closed temporarily due to a weather related accident.
    Morgan County was hit with more than six inches overnight.  Teachers who commute from Ogden were stuck in the canyon and buses were stuck in the snow, so Morgan Elementary and Mountain Green Elementary were both closed for the day.  This is a rare occurrence in Morgan, so students were thrilled and kids all through the county pulled out their sleds and made the most of it.
    The first snowfall of the year is historically bad for driving conditions, which makes it especially important to slow down and drive carefully.

  • Every year there is an annual weigh-off to determine the largest pumpkin grown in the state of Utah.  It is sponsored by the Utah Giant Pumpkin Growers Association.  Matt McConkie, Mountain Green resident, holds the current state record.  His enormous pumpkin weighed in last year at a whopping 1,600 pounds.

  • Morgan County is home to some of the most active kids I have ever seen, so it is no surprise that there is a new outdoor sports team in the area, the Morgan MTB race team. 

  • Saturday afternoon the public met to break ground on a brand new building for the Morgan Health Center and the staff and residents couldn’t be happier. 

  • Monday is usually a pretty low key day at Taggart’s Grill, but this week was different.  HGTV’s House Hunters team paid a visit to the local restaurant to shoot footage for their show. 

  • This year has marked the one-year anniversary of several businesses on State Street, and LiquiFaction Internet Café is one of them.  LiquiFaction first opened its doors on Aug. 29, 2011, but the grand opening was two days later.  At that time, owner, Lee Kellogg, invited all city and county employees to come in and get a free drink for the day to give him some training time.    

  • At the entrance of Riverside Park, there is a big rock monument with “Early Morgan Pioneers” engraved at the top.  Under the engraving there is a list of some amazing people who have shaped Morgan County into what it is today.  

  • When the Morgan City Council envisioned the Riverside Park splash pad, one of the things they hoped it would do is bring out-of-town visitors to generate revenue for other Morgan businesses, and it has done just that.

  • Relay for Life is a big deal in Morgan County.  Relay for Life is an event sponsored by the American Cancer Society to help raise funds for cancer research.   All across the world people are affected by cancer in some way, and Morgan is no different.  It seems that around every corner there is another tragic story.  For this reason, the community rallies in support of this event.  Windows of local businesses are filled with footprints that have been purchased to help the cause.  

  • DeMarre Carroll was welcomed to the Trojan Center with big cheers from all the junior Jazz players in the audience.  Carroll was born July 27, 1986, is 6’8” and just finished his third year in the NBA and his first year with the Utah Jazz.  

  • Pioneer Day was celebrated in different ways throughout Morgan County this year. One of the celebrations was the Milton round-up, which was inspired by the hard work of two Milton Eagle Scouts. In an earlier article, credit was given to Brayden Stegelmeier and Miles Mecham for their huge undertaking. The two scouts replaced the Milton park horse arena fence. The arena is used by the entire northwestern area of the Morgan Valley, especially by 4-H horse enthusiasts. 

  • Every year local youth look forward to an appearance from one of our very own Utah Jazz players.  This year, local Jr. Jazz participants will meet Jazz forward, #3, DeMarre Carroll.  Carroll was born July 27, 1986, is 6’8” and just finished his third year in the NBA and his first year with the Jazz.

  • The second annual Livastride Home Run Derby and Summer Slam Tournament were hosted in Morgan last weekend.  This tournament has drawn a crowd of nearly 3,000 people to Morgan City since its inception.  There were 50 teams that competed in this year’s Summer Slam and Morgan’s own high school baseball team took second place in their division.

  • After attending the grand opening celebration for the new Riverside Park splash pad, I am bursting with pride.  Many people don’t know what a huge undertaking this really was, it was a true labor of love and  the funds used for this project were raised almost entirely by the local community.  

  • Every year residents enjoy events put on by their local cities and counties, but not many people truly have a grasp of the magnitude of work that goes into their success.  One shining example of the hard work and dedication of these volunteers is the annual Morgan 4th of July celebration.  

  • The fifth-annual Marie McQuiddy Daley softball tournament was held last weekend.  Marie was diagnosed with breast cancer in May of 2006.  She was a strong woman with a beautiful smile and a big heart, so the community was left with a void when she lost her battle with cancer on January 16, 2007.  Marie fought hard against cancer and played hard during her softball career in high school and college.

  • The Morgan 4th of July parade had a new twist to it this year.  All townships were invited to create a float and enter it into the parade.  The floats were judged and winners were announced during the evening entertainment at the football stadium.  First place, and winner of the Grand Prize trophy, went to Round Valley second place went to Peterson and third place went to Porterville.  Honorable Mentions were also awarded to Enterprise, Stoddard and Taggart.  The Morgan 4th committee appreciates all the time and effort that went into creating these floats and would like to thank all those who participated in this challenge. 

  • This year marked the 10 year anniversary of the Widowmaker Event in Croydon. The event was started in 2002 with the help of Albert Wilde and his family.  The Widowmaker Hillclimb and Adventure Expo is a three-day event that brings in riders from all over the U.S. and Canada to try to climb the 1000 foot hill.  

  • The Morgan County Sheriff vehicles have a new look.  You will soon see them around town, hopefully to the side of the road or in passing, and not behind you enforcing the ‘Click it or Ticket’ law which is currently in full force.  

  • Friday, June 1, 1st Bank hosted a barbecue for the community at their Morgan City location.  The event brought in a crowd of over 300 people.  Kent Francis served up hamburgers and hot dogs and guests had an array of chips, cookies and drink to choose from on the table beside him.  1st bank has 10J branches, and anyone who brought in a friend to open a new checking account received a free gift.  They were also entered into a drawing for a Kindle Fire or an Apple iPad.  There were 10 given out in all, one at each branch.  1st Bank would like to thank the community for coming out and sharing their day.  The bank’s next event will be a car wash on July 13.  It is a big event each year and proceeds go to their Relay For Life team which raises money for the American Cancer Society.  They would like to invite everyone out to come and support them in the fight against cancer.

  • Morgan Valley Voices is a non-profit music organization that teaches children of all ages to use the one instrument they always have with them, their voice. Singers ages 5 and up are taught music theory and principles through games and songs using the methods of Zoltán Kodály.

  • Residents and strangers came together for a great cause on Monday.  Rob Saunders and friends came up with an idea to do something wonderful for their friend and neighbor, Charese Foster.   Charese was diagnosed last year with invasive ductal carcinoma (breast cancer) that has also spread to her liver, lungs, lymph system and brain.