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Family traditions celebrated

Article Date: 
27 December, 2013 (All day)

The word “tradition,” has a complex definition. Webster’s New Explorer Dictionary defines tradition to be “a belief or custom passed from generations to generation.”
 Some Morgan County residents shared their traditions.
Jay & Janet Thomson
“Every year, the last week of July or the first week of August, we as a family go camping at our ‘secret spot’ and spend a couple of days picking huckleberries.  We also play on our four wheelers and shoot .22’s at targets to see who’s the best shot,” recalled Jay Thomson.  
It takes about eight hours for one person to pick a gallon of huckleberries and our minimum for a trip is at least two gallons for each family.  They can be purchased for $75.00 per gallon, which is a lot cheaper than one can pick them for.  By the time you add in expenses of gas, food, camping equipment, etc., it’s probably twice that expensive.  However, the point is to be together as a family is the mountains, listening to the sounds of the forest, smelling the pine trees mixed with the aroma of huckleberries and enjoying God’s beautiful creations, and of course, having purple stained fingers, hands and mouths.
  Since those huckleberries have to last a whole year, we get to eat them at Thanksgiving, Christmas and our birthdays. “Janet makes a huckleberry cobbler that took her six years to perfect, and without doubt, is the very best dessert on the planet,” exclaimed Jay.  “We have been told by others that her cobbler is the best dessert they have ever eaten.  We look forward every year to our huckleberry picking trip.”  
The Thomsons are airplane pilots, retired and enjoy spending time with their family near and far. They have been called to serve a mission in Cove Fort and leave April 2014. This will be their third mission for the LDS Church.
Ryan and Amy Everhart 
“We have small traditions that happen weekly.  We eat dinner together every night as a family and hold Bible study every Wednesday night.  One of our holiday traditions includes eating food the family doesn’t like the day before Thanksgiving, so then we have a lot to be thankful for on Thanksgiving.  How’s that for a tradition?  Christmas Eve we make finger foods and stay up till midnight pigging out and listening to Christmas music.  At midnight we open our presents and then go skiing first thing Christmas morning,” commented Amy Everhart.  
Ryan has a chiropractic practice in Morgan and Amy is an artist with her paintings displayed among other Utah artists at the Rocky Mountain Art Gallery in Morgan.
Daniel and Valerie Hancock 
 The Hancock family tradition came about gradually.  When their sons were 10 and 12 years of age, the Hancocks wanted to have some good family time together. They started having chocolate cake every Sunday night which occasionally included the children’s friends. Sometimes they would sit and visit, other times they may watch a movie together while enjoying this delicious cake. 
Valerie said though they don’t have chocolate cake every Sunday anymore, they still get together with their children and grandchildren.
Valerie, is the Morgan County Librarian and mentioned that library has some pictures and books about Christmas traditions from around the world in their display case now through the end of December.