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Exchange Student Host Families Needed

Article Date: 
17 June, 2011 (All day)

 

Each year thousands of international students arrive in the United States to participate in a high school foreign exchange programs dedicated to helping people gain understanding, acquire knowledge, and develop skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world. These young ambassadors will spend 5-10 months with American families and attend local high schools throughout the country. 

 Educatius International’s mission is simple. We believe that, through these youth exchanges, we can break down the barriers that divide people, not only across international borders, but also even within our own communities. This is a great opportunity to experience another country without leaving your home. We learn ways to better communicate and overcome differences. In the long run, this type of program helps to ensure a more peaceful world. By living and working with these teenagers, we will broaden both our minds and their minds, and we will be able to establish a building block or a bridge to a more promising future for all of us.

Educatius International is eager to bring these international ambassadors to different communities. An international coordinator will secure host families for the students and they will provide support and guidance throughout the experience.

You cannot imagine how rewarding it is to bring the world into someone’s home and to see the bond between a host family and a teenager from another part of the world. Students will come from many different countries. They have studied English for a minimum of 2 years and range from 15-18 years of age. They arrive with a variety of interests and are eagerness to participate with and learn from their host families.

Host families are expected to treat them as their own son or daughter, provide a bed, three meals a day, and a quiet space to study as well as love and support them. Each student will carry sufficient spending money. Their medical insurance coverage is excellent. Host families do not have to have teenagers to be able to host. Imagine how much education you can expose your growing children to. It is also a perfect opportunity to cure the empty-nest syndrome for those without children at home. Host Families receive a monthly stipend to offset some of the expenses of having a teenager in the home.

For more information about the program and how you can host one of these students, please contact:

Sky Butters, junsui_sky@hotmail.com, (801)829-8677 

If you are interested, please call me as soon as possible as I have students arriving in the U.S. in August so I am looking for host families now. I would be glad to answer all of your questions as well as bring profiles of students to your home so that you can pick a student that best fits your family!

 

 

One Family’s Experience

 

 

“There is no better way to learn about the world than welcoming foreign exchange students into your family, school and community”

My name is Rhonda Smay and I live in Sedgwick, CO with my 4 children. I have been involved with foreign exchange students now for several years and I’ve learned that the world can be made better through this experience. Until you have experienced it, you cannot imagine how rewarding it is to bring the world into your own home and to see the bond being created between a host family and a teenager from another part of the world. Having these students in our homes does help us gain understanding, acquire knowledge, and learn skills needed to live in our culturally diverse world. 

I personally have had students from Poland, Brazil, France, Spain, Korea, Thailand, Germany, Sweden, Ecuador, Macedonia, Lithuania, and Azerbaijan. We have bought a globe and a world map to hang on our wall (what a learning experience for my kids) to learn about latitude and longitude, to see where our host kids lived in relation to us, not to mention the size of their country compared to ours.  Have you heard of Azerbaijan?  We hadn’t (except maybe at opening ceremonies of the Olympics when we always wonder where in the world ARE all of those countries?).  Now, we know where it is and a little bit about the countries and their cultures – we have even learned a few words in several different languages - It’s great! When people ask me ”what is the most difficult part of hosting a foreign student” my answer will always be “the day they have to get on a plane and go back to their natural parents” 

By having these students live with our families, we break down the barriers that divide people, not only across international borders, but also within our own community. It’s a great opportunity to experience another country without leaving your home.  The rewards your family will reap are unlimited.

I urge everyone to consider the possibility of volunteering to host an exchange student. I would be happy to answer any questions from anyone that’s interested. 

 

Rhonda J. Smay         Regional Director

Educatius International

Rhonda.smay@educatius.org

(970) 324-9364