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District selects new superintendent

Article Date: 
19 April, 2013 (All day)

The Morgan County School District announced its selection for its next superintendent of schools. 
Dr. Doug Jacobs from Kanab will take over as Morgan’s new superintendent July 1.  Ken Adams will step down as superintendent June 30.
Jacobs grew up in Kanab, Utah.  He was educated at Southern Utah University, Utah State University and Nova Southeastern University.   His experience in education spans 26 years, beginning as an elementary teacher in Las Vegas, Nevada, and moving on to include serving as a principal at Kanab High School, Kanab Elementary School, and Kanab Middle School. 
His wife, Carol Lee, is also an educator.  She has taught Kindergarten and sixth grade in the last 12 years.  They have four children: two married sons attending Southern Utah University, a daughter attending Evans cosmetology College, and another daughter who is a senior in high school.
The Utah State Board Association aided the district in selecting its new superintendent.  The state board offered Morgan an advertising service to post the position state- and nation-wide. The state board also acted as a clearinghouse to collect, filter, clear and process potential candidates.
The state board forwarded six candidates for the Morgan position.  Shortly after, one candidate withdrew, citing personal concerns.
“Unfortunately this year, we did not have any internal Morgan School District applicants apply,” according to an email sent from School Board Member Ken Durrant.  “We hope this will not be the case in the future as Morgan has many outstanding educators.”
Some 37 community individuals including teachers, parents, business owners and others reviewed resumes of the five candidates.  The group evaluated each candidate, assessed qualifications, and ranked each.  After reviewing the recommendations, the pool was narrowed to three candidates, who were each interviewed by the school board and school administrators.
Interviews were “detailed,” and many questions were asked, including educational philosophy, knowledge of state and school law/financing, approach and resolutions to potential community concerns,   and the role as a community leader.
“The community from which Dr. Jacobs comes from reluctantly recommended him to be our new superintendent as they knew they would be losing a great educator, a community leader, and in many cases, a dear friend,” Durrant said in an email.